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Winner of the 2014 "Artist of the Year" Award from Young Audiences of Maryland.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpiUPvgG7jE

Sue Trainor inspires creativity in concert and in workshops. Her participant-centered, experiential programs motivate children and adults to explore new skills and ideas. Sue’s energy and enthusiasm capture everyone’s attention and her sense of humor and down-to-earth approach keep it.

Go to the VIDEO/PHOTO section (below) to see video from Benfield Elementary's songwriting residency closing concert. Three fourth grade classes sing the songs they composed about cells, Maryland history, and summer vacation.

School Assembly Video below, from Roland Park School, Baltimore:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEVewNAy06w

 

Mo. Co. Head Start - July 16, 2015

Thanks so much for including me in your professional development programs this week. I truly enjoyed working with you!

Here are the songs and chants we used today. Please let me know if you have questions, and please stay in touch!

Also, remember to check out the new Wolf Trap website at Education.WolfTrap.org. Note: It's NOT www.Education.WolfTrap.org. You'll get an error message if you use that.

 

WHO'S A GOOD WATCHER?

  Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis 

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time. 

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

 

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult. 

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

 

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions: 

  • Use other parts of the body.
  • Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
  • Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
  • Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.

 

 

 CAN YOU SIT ON YOUR SPOT?

 By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Mrs. Tin

 Transition that changes from one topic to another. Builds excitement.

 

G   E GG    E
Hello Mrs. Tin

Place an object related to the upcoming lesson in a cookie tin. Tell children that Mrs. Tin is still sleeping; we have to wake her up. Invite selected children to "knock on her door." In between knocks, invite all children to sing "Hello Mrs. Tin" in order to encourage vocalization and participation from everyone. Depending on your objectives and the con tents of the tin, children may be invited to hold the tin, shake it, and predict the contents. Depending on the children, the eventual opening of the tin may be dramatic. Depending on the children, you might want to offer peeks at this point, inviting children to keep the secret.

 

HOLD IT!

Adaptation of an experience developed by Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist Roberta Lucas

 

This is a Cumulative Song: each verse repeats exactly, but adds new words onto what came before. This also is an Echo Song: Leader sings or calls out each, and participants echo back.

 

1.

Leader: Wake up toes it's time to dance (make a toe motion)

Leader: Time to jump and time to prance (add jump, and "prance" motion) 

Leader: Hold it!   (hold hands out in “stop” pose)

Leader: Hands UP  (raise arms)

Leader: Chi-chi cha-cha chi-chi cha-cha Go-Go-Go!  (make a wiggley motion with hands still raised in the air) 

 

2. Repeat the song, and after Hands UP (echo) add  feet apart! (echo) then do chi-chi… refrain.

 

3. Repeat -- do Hands UP (echo), feet apart (echo), add knees bent (echo) , chi-chi…. Refrain.

 

Others to add:

-- knees together

-- bottoms out

-- heads up

-- tongues out

 

Walking Through the Forest

Source:                                     Traditional

 

Procedure:

1.  Introduction:  Invite children to imagine that we are going on a walk in the forest.  What kinds of animals will we see? Show pictures,  and review sounds and motions that the animals make.

 

2. Begin in a line, with each person facing the back of the person in front.

 

3. Set-up: Cue singing with a phrase that sets the starting pitch and beat, such as “Here we go!”

 

4. Sing the song as we walk through the room.

 

C      C      C               D    E    G    D   G    E    C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C      C     C          D    E   G

Walking through the forest

D          D  G   C

What do I see?

 

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

 

D         G  G   C

Come, follow me!

 

5. Repeat.

 

Extensions:

  • Use pictures or stuffed animals for children to discover and identify as we walk through the room.
  • Change “forest” to other locations: walking through the city, on the beach, down the hall, etc.

 

PRECIPITATION

-      Sue Trainor

Sing (Adams Family): Word of the day (clap, clap)….

  1. Reveal “precipitation.” What do you think that word means?
  2. Teachers: Please join this conversation. 
  3. I made a song about it!

Refrain:

  c    c  c    D#         c

Pre-ci-pi-taaaaaa – tion

c      c c      D#        c

Pre-ci-pi-taaaaaa - tion

 

  1. Teach the verse:

C         F    F    F      C        D#  D    C

Sometimes it rains, sometimes it snows

C         D    D    D      C    C       D#   D       C

Sometimes ice falls from the clouds, you know

C      F     F     F     C    D#    D      C

We need that rain, we need that snow

C    D     D   E E      F       G

It helps all living things grow!

 

            Repeat refrain

 

    7.  Let’s make movements for the different kinds of precipitation. Which one should we do first?   All stand up; try things.  TA/teachers notice different choices. Choose one.   Repeat .  How could we show “all living things grow?”

  1. The song says “Sometimes” – maybe some people could be rain and some people could be snow. How could we decide who will take which part?

     9.  Put it all together.

 

LIFE CYCLES GOES AROUND

-Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:

1)    Use the phrase “Life Cycle”

2)    Retell the sequence of the book.

 

 

DAY 1

- Here are are. Look around. What do you see?

-        Show leaf prop. Sing, to the tune of “Green Grass Grows All Around”:

 

In the garden    there was a leaf

The prettiest leaf     that you ever did see

            Leaf in the garden and

            The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

-        TEACHER, please briefly discuss with children: What’s a cycle? What does that mean? What does life cycle mean?

 

- Add to the leaf prop, an egg prop.

And on that leaf    there was an egg

The prettiest egg     that you ever did see

            Egg on the leaf and the leaf in the garden and

            The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

-        Teacher please co-lead the discussion: What could be in the egg?

 

-        Out of the egg comes a caterpillar prop

And in that egg   there was a caterpillar

The prettiest caterpillar     that you ever did see

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

AND HE WAS SO HUNGRY! 

REPEAT: Create hand/arm gestures for leaf, egg and caterpillar.

REPEAT: Create full-body representations.  Use a green cloth to represent the leaf. Have small groups come to the front to be eggs hatching into caterpillars.

AND HE WAS SO HUNGRY, he walked off looking for something to eat. Bye caterpillar!

DAY 2

-        Sing the song with hand/arm gestures to review the story so far.

 

-        That caterpillar was so hungry!

Chant in steady beat:

                  Caterpillar, Caterpillar

Caterpillar, Caterpillar

What do caterpillars do?

All they do is chew and chew!

 

      -  Our caterpillars are looking for food.

MODEL: Caterpillars walk slowly – keep a slow, steady beat with the drum.  Look for food, find it, bring it slowly back to the circle.

TREASURE HUNT: Food (copies of the food in the book, one apple, two pears, etc.) is placed around the room for our caterpillars to find. Each child gets a caterpillar image. Manage children’s movement as agreed, depart the circle by table, for example. KEEP STEADY BEAT and continue the chant.

Children find food and bring it back to the circle, still walking to slow steady beat.

                                    Chant: Munch, munch, munch-munch-munch

Discuss: What did your caterpillar eat?  Optional: Invite children to put food illustrations in a sequence.

We’ll leave our caterpillars to eat and grow! 

 

 

Day 3

Finish the song; put it in our bodies as on Day 1. 

Use  props or icons posted in sequence to help children remember.

And on that caterpillar, there is a chrysalis

The prettiest chrysalis  that you ever did see

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

                  And in the crysallis   there is a butterfly

                  The prettiest butterfly   that you ever did see

                  Butterfly in the chrysalis

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

                  And in that butterfly    there is an egg

                  The prettiest egg    that you ever did see

                  Egg in the butterfly  and the

Butterfly in the chrysalis

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

And what do you think happened to the egg in the butterfly?

 

 

 

San Antonio Pre-K 4 SA - June 11, 2015

Hi, San Antonio Friends!!

Here is repertoire and some planning ideas from our workshops June 10 & 11. I truly enjoyed working with you all! Please stay in touch, and remember to sign up for the Wolf Trap website: www.education.wolftrap.org             

Welcome to the Wolf Trap family!

Sue

 

Who's a Good Watcher

 Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time.

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

                   

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult.

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions:

Use other parts of the body.
Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.
 

 Have You Got Your Spot?

 By Sue Trainor

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot



2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Walking Through the Forest
Source:                                     Traditional
                   
Procedure:
1.  Introduction:  Invite children to imagine that we are going on a walk in the forest.  What kinds of animals will we see? Show pictures,  and review sounds and motions that the animals make.
 
2. Begin in a line, with each person facing the back of the person in front.
 
3. Set-up: Cue singing with a phrase that sets the starting pitch and beat, such as “Here we go!”
 
4. Sing the song as we walk through the room.
 
C      C      C               D    E    G    D   G    E    C
Walking through the forest, forest, forest
C      C     C          D    E   G
Walking through the forest
D          D  G   C
What do I see?
 
(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)
 
D         G  G   C

Come, follow me!
 
5. Repeat.
 
Extensions:
Use pictures or stuffed animals for children to discover and identify as we walk through the room.
Change “forest” to other locations: walking through the city, on the beach, down the hall, etc.
 
 
  Song :    Here’s What I Like       

 by Sue Trainor

 Objectives:   Steady Beat, Recall, Describing events    
Procedure:

1.  Leader chants, with motions:
 
Here’s what I like (roll hands)
Oh yeah (point with right hand)
Here’s what I like (roll hands)
Oh yeah (point with left hand)
Here’s what I like (roll hands)
 In our lesson today (tap knees with both hands)
 2. Repeat. Invite children to join motions and the chant.
3. Invite children to recall what was done in the lesson. A quick review by the leader may be helpful in some cases.
 
 Awa Atu
Source: Traditional, from Ghana. Collected from Kofi Dennis.

Objectives:  Singing voice, Matching pitch, Expressing feelings, Managing transition (closing)
Procedure:

1. Explain the words and motions:

“Awa” means “I’m happy we are together”
  Hold arms open and wide, and wave them up and down as though you are happy to see your friends.
“Atu” means “hug.”
Fold arms across your chest, hugging yourself.
2. Set-up: Sing a cue phrase in order to give children the starting pitch and beat. “Let’s all sing.”
3. Everyone sings the song and does the motions together.
 
D –G D-G D-G
Awa Awa Awa
A-B A-B A-B
Atu Atu Atu
B-c-A…….
Awa
A-B-G…..
Atu
4. Repeat, perhaps several times.

Extensions:
Begin in a circle so that everyone is facing. Make eye contact.
Begin in two circles, one circle faces in. The second circle of people is inside facing people in the outer circle. Rotate the inner circle with each repetition. If appropriate, people may hug each other.


Mrs. Tin

Collected from Mary Gresock, Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist

Objectives:  Singing Voice, Matching pitch, Tone, Prediction, Participation in a group, Self-regulation

Procedure:

1. Leader holds up a container that contains an object related to the objective of the lesson.

2. Introduce the container as “Mrs. Tin” and tell the children that Mrs. Tin is sleeping.

3. Tap on Mrs. Tin and sing “Hello Mrs. Tin” (notes are G E GG E). Sing the song and go around the classroom, allowing the children to tap on Mrs. Tin and sing hello.

4. When anticipation is built and enough turns are taken, dramatically open the top and let children peek.

 HOLD IT!

Adaptation of an experience developed by Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist Roberta Lucas

This is a Cumulative Song: each verse repeats exactly, but adds new words onto what came before. This also is an Echo Song: Leader sings or calls out each, and participants echo back.

1.

Leader: Wake up toes it's time to dance (make a toe motion)

Leader: Time to jump and time to prance (add jump, and "prance" motion)

Leader: Hold it!   (hold hands out in “stop” pose)

Leader: Hands UP  (raise arms)

Leader: Chi-chi cha-cha chi-chi cha-cha Go-Go-Go!  (make a wiggley motion with hands still raised in the air)

2. Repeat the song, and after Hands UP (echo) add  feet apart! (echo) then do chi-chi… refrain.

3. Repeat -- do Hands UP (echo), feet apart (echo), add knees bent (echo) , chi-chi…. Refrain.

 Others to add:

-- knees together

-- bottoms out

-- heads up

-- tongues out

 

ECP Great Adaptations Workshop - April 19, 2015

Hi, all! Thanks for joining me yesterday. As promised, here are the music experiences we explored during our time together. Hope the experiences you planned are successful for you - let me know how it goes!

Also, because I ran out of the "Great Musical Adaptations" handout, here is the link to that:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/GreatAdaptationsMasterRevised2%20copy.doc

 

Here are the music experiences:

WHO’S A GOOD WATCHER?

  Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis 

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time. 

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

 

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult. 

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

 

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions: 

  • Use other parts of the body.
  • Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
  • Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
  • Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.

 

 

 Have You Got Your Spot?

 By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Mrs. Tin

 Transition that changes from one topic to another. Builds excitement.

G   E GG    E
Hello Mrs. Tin

Place an object related to the upcoming lesson in a cookie tin. Tell children that Mrs. Tin is still sleeping; we have to wake her up. Invite selected children to "knock on her door." In between knocks, invite all children to sing "Hello Mrs. Tin" in order to encourage vocalization and participation from everyone. Depending on your objectives and the con tents of the tin, children may be invited to hold the tin, shake it, and predict the contents. Depending on the children, the eventual opening of the tin may be dramatic. Depending on the children, you might want to offer peeks at this point, inviting children to keep the secret.

 

Song :                       Bears Eat Fish

Source:                                     Sue Trainor, original

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, healthy eating, cognitive development, self-regulation, dramatic play, locomotor movement

 Role Play: The leader says: "Let's pretend to be bears!Will our bears be big or small? Big? Ok, let me see your big bear arms. (Comment on what individual children are doing.) Show me your big bear legs. (Comment on what children are doing.). My bear is hungry! How about yours?"

Melody: Within a few repetitions, children will join the singing of this song, so it’s important to sing in “head voice.”

Steady Beat: Because we’re pretending to be big bears, the speed of the song is moderate to slow, with heavy emphasis on each word: “Bears    eat     fish.”  (Note that there is a rest in the lyrics – there are 4 beats in each line, but only three words – tap the 4th beat in order to keep steady beat.) 

 

Sing:

E         D     C
Bears eat fish
E         D     C
Bears eat fish
      F       F   G   A  G
    When I am hungry
     E          E       F  G
     That's what I wish
E          D   C
Bears eat fish

Still pretending to be bears, children go out around the room to find fish-shaped props and bring them back.to the meeting area, while we sing:  “Bears catch fish….”

Children place their fish on a cookie sheet, which we pretend to put in the oven. Sing:  “Bears cook fish….”
 
 Make a "ding" sound like a kitchen timer and take the fish out of the "oven."  Each child takes a fish and pretends to eat. Sing:   “Bears eat fish….”
 Take off our pretend bear costumes and collect the fish props.

Recall details about our experience, such as Where did you catch the fish? What color fish did you catch? Did your bear like to eat the fish?

 

I HAVE A BOX (Chant)

Collected and adapted from Katherine Lyons, Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist

Objective: Transition to new subject, content

Put something in the box that is featured in the day's lesson.

 

I have a box

The box has a top

Let's oooooopen it up  (open slowly)

And .... Stop! (Shut the box dramatically)

 

3-Drawer Extension

I use the first drawer as clue to our discussion; it draws prior knowledge and asks children to predict.

The second drawer is always "Word of the Day."

The third drawer relates to the first two and transitions into the activity.

The example I offered was 1) a picture of a turtle, 2) the word "slow" and 3) a ball.

 

I have a box

The box has a drawer

Let's puuuuulll....

And push!

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